Archives for posts with tag: recyclerfinder.com
CD Case Recycling at RecyclerFinder.com

Say goodby to CD's, the 90's and these nut jobs! My eyes hurt!

MP3 players, such as iPods, have revolutionized how the masses buy music and provide a compact way to carry around entire music libraries, while also reducing one’s carbon footprint. These rechargeable gadgets have popularized digital downloads and reduced the demand for CDs, making them a big win for the environment, which is music to our planet’s ears.

Of course, with this eco-friendly move away from CDs, which are notoriously hard on the environment with their material requirements, manufacturing process, packaging and long-distance delivery, there are plenty of folks who now are wondering what to do with all of those old CD cases that are taking up space on their bookshelves. The key, of course, is to recycle, which leads to the question of where exactly this CD case recycling happens.

Some CD cases have a recycling code, which most often consists of a triangle with a 6 inside and PS underneath. This lets us know that CDs are categorized as type 6 plastic – aka polystyrene. This type of plastic is not often accepted for pick-up in curbside recycle bins in most cities, but using a site like RecyclerFinder.com is an simple, convenient way to locate recycling facilities that accept CD cases. This makes it easy to do your part to save the planet and helps you get rid of all of those old cases that are no longer needed.

Find places to recycle CD cases at RecyclerFinder.com!

Recycler Finder

The Happiest Place on Earth!

Theme parks aren’t known for their recycling efforts or for attempting to reduce their carbon footprint. But with recent developments it seems that amusement parks are starting to do their part to keep the world as green as possible as long as possible.Major theme parks like Six Flags and Disney World have started recycling programs in order to keep the millions upon millions of plastic cups and the like out of landfills. Some amusement parks have even switched to biofuel to fuel rides and machines, friendly cleaning products and locally grown ingredients in their eateries.

An online company called Green Halo Systems allows users to track what they recycle and where it’s going. What this means for amusement parks is that Green Halo software will give them the ability to see what they waste and how much they waste. Now companies can see first hand the impact they have on the environment rather than having to make an educated guess. Any data from Green Halo software can be shared with multiple users and can also be printed out.

Other efforts some theme parks are making to go green are using LED lights, switching to water-saving fixtures and switching from plastic trash bags to ones that are biodegradable.

For many of us, an amusement park is one of the last places that we could think of as going green, but why not? It’s place where a large amount of people gather, eat and walk, which can add up to quite a lot of trash in a short amount of time. Amusement parks are doing their part to keep the environment intact, make sure you’re doing yours.

Find places to recycle packaging at RecyclerFinder.com!
Recycling Tea Bags at Recycler Finder

Tea anyone?

Relaxing with a cup of tea is just about as good as it gets. A few moments of steeping and the tea is ready to drink but how should a person dispose of the used teabag and now empty packet? There are several options for ensuring tea waste is disposed of properly. While yes, empty packets and teabags are not going to overrun the landfills on their own, there are so many environmentally friendly options available to recycle or even reuse the packets.

Some varieties of tea are packaged in foil-lined packets. These packets are not considered paper in terms of recycling and are not recyclable in most areas. The greenest option for the environmentally conscious tea drinker is to change to a brand of tea sold as loose-leaf or packaged in plain paper packets suitable for recycling.

There are countless ways to keep foil-lined packets from ending up in a landfill. How about reusing those foil-lined packets to store seeds? The foil blocks light and prevents moisture from reaching the seeds, making them perfect for storage. In the spring, use the packets to start the seeds. The foil lining helps retain moisture in the small amount of soil held in the packet. Other options include numerous craft ideas. Kaleidoscope folding with empty packets makes unique embellishments for use on scrapbook pages, cards and other paper crafts. Use a variety of empty tea packets to decoupage a box or canister. It could be the perfect place to store recently purchased loose-leaf tea.

Find places to recycle anything @ RecyclerFinder.com

RecyclerFinder.com

Be my Valentine! XXXOOO

Red roses and chocolates are popular Valentine’s Day gifts, but they are usually not good for the planet. Imported roses are associated with the use of pesticides, and the most popular brands of chocolate are not organic or grown in a healthy environment. Still, one of the best ways to celebrate love is to keep it personal and totally unique. With this in mind, there are plenty of ways to keep Valentine’s Day green.

Everyone loves to receive homemade cookies or brownies. These can be made with organic ingredients, and there won’t be any packaging to throw out.

Many couples like to dine out, and it isn’t hard to find restaurants that are green. Some of the most romantic restaurants are the ones that are independently owned and not part of a large chain. In most cases, these restaurants use organic food that is grown locally.

A quiet meal at home is a nice alternative to eating out. This doesn’t have to be a fancy dinner; it can be a simple meal of fruit, cheese and a nice bottle of organic wine.

It’s possible to give flowers as a gift without harming the planet, and there are several alternatives to roses that are in season now. A live plant also makes a great Valentine’s Day gift. A potted plant is not only good for the environment, but it is also the perfect way to express undying love.

Find places to recycle anything @ www.RecyclerFinder.com!

Congrats Giants, great game!

With the excitement of Super Bowl Sunday still on people’s minds as they gather around the water cooler to discuss the plays and highlights, we want to ask the question just where does all that trash go? Are stadiums doing anything to be environmentally responsible?

Sports stadiums across the U.S. are joining the movement to go green. At the college and professional levels, recycling initiatives and other methods to minimize waste are helping the environment and earning the programs nationwide recognition.The statistics are startling. In an average year, an estimated 65 million football fans generate 19,500 tons of trash. Cans, bottles and food containers pile up in trash receptacles from the parking lot to the stadium to the restrooms.College football stadiums, in particular, have made great strides in protecting the environment. One well-publicized example is participation in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Game Day Challenge for college sports stadiums.

In 2008, The New York Times featured the University of Colorado Buffaloes for introducing a composting and recycling initiative that eliminated 80 percent of their waste. They replaced Styrofoam containers with cardboard, and people looking for trashcans in the stadium found composting and recycling bins instead.

In 2010, the EPA presented UC Davis with an award for similar zero-waste efforts. After the games, students and volunteers often had to sort through the containers. Yet, in both cases, once people got over the learning curve of what needed to be recycled and composted, the process was easy. It was helpful to have both written information in the form of programs and billboards at the games, along with staff members instructing the fans.

The efforts are not limited to food containers. Prepared food at games is a huge source of waste that can be recycled, and much of it is now delivered to local shelters and soup kitchens.

Find places to recycle almost anything @ www.RecyclerFinder.com

Support your environment!

Plastic, glass, and paper are recycled without being given a second thought, but what about recycling bras? While it may seem like an odd question, there are a number of companies taking the initiative to recycle these used undergarments.
There are hundreds of thousands of undergarments purchased by women each year, most of which end up in the landfill. However, a bra has more potential than many realize and shouldn’t be thrown out in such haste.Leading undergarment manufacturers in Japan are recycling used bras in order to make fuel for industrial use. Not only does it help to reduce the amount of bras that make it to the landfill, but it also helps them to pursue green business practices that benefit the environment.Although, as of yet, there aren’t any programs in the United States that convert used bras into fuel, there are other ways women can recycle their unwanted undergarments.
Bra Recyclers collect used and new bras and distribute them to women in need. While they aren’t converted into fuel, recycling bras in this manner still helps the environment by reducing the amount of waste that would have gone to landfill. The Bosom Buddy Program is another great option. Just like Bra Recyclers, The Bosom Buddy Program helps women in need, assisting them in their pursuit for self-sufficiency.

Next time, while sorting through recyclables, don’t forget to sift through old bras. Any bras that are in good and working condition are eligible for the program.

Find places to recycle clothing @ www.RecyclerFinder.com
Pilots toasting RecyclerFinder.com

Now that might just call for a toast! Enjoy your flibe, I mean flight today!

For those travelers wishing to shrink their carbon footprint, Virgin Airlines offers an eco-friendly flying experience. Greenopia, a Santa Barbara research group, performs an annual ranking of airlines based on their response to environmental concerns. Greenopia ranked Virgin America top of the 10 airlines rated. According to Greenopia, Virgin America does a great job of flying green. While air travel consumes more energy than other forms of travel, at least Virgin America’s passengers can be proud of Virgin’s sustainability.

Virgin Airlines makes it easy for eco-concerned passengers to purchase carbon offset units. The airline’s young fleet of planes are fuel efficient in both consumption and emissions, and Virgin increased its use of biofuels. Virgin not only recycles at its headquarters, but 47 percent of flight wastes are recycled as well. Virgin’s terminal at San Francisco Airport is LEED certified, meaning the building was designed to have the least impact on the environment, a certain stamp of green approval.

When measuring the airlines’ impact on the environment, Greenopia factored in recycling programs, transparency in reporting about energy consumption, company spending on researching alternative fuels and the relative ease for passengers to buy carbon offsets when they travel. While Virgin America rated first overall, Continental Airlines was top of the list for the major carriers. Delta Air Lines made the most improvement in lessening its impact on the environment in the past year. As an industry, Greenopia reports, airlines reduced their carbon footprint over 30 percent in the past decade in contrast to most companies making two to three percent change in going green. Following Virgin’s example, airlines are getting greener all the time.

Find recycling facilities around the country and across the friendly skies @ www.RecyclerFinder.com