Archives for posts with tag: recycle
Find places to recycle disposable razors at RecyclerFinder.com

Find places to recycle disposable razors at RecyclerFinder.com

Every year, Americans damage the environment by purchasing and throwing away over two billion disposable razors and razor blades. That means that billions of these pieces of plastic are going to waste and piling up in landfills across the country year after year. The negative impact on the environment could at least partially be avoided through recycling.

Recycling Disposable Razors

Cutting down on waste may be a matter of choosing to recycle a razor or purchase a razor that is made with recycled materials. Some shaving companies are now running programs that allow consumers to send back their used blades and handles to be recycled into new products. The most environmentally-friendly businesses offer a combination of recycled and recyclable handles, with handles made of 100 percent recycled materials that can also be sent back to the company to again be recycled.

Unfortunately, it is not possible to recycle blades in the United States unless the shaving company is specifically running a program in which they allow consumers to send back their used blades. Currently, there is one company in the United States that is actively advertising their ability to recycle a used razor. The company, located in Massachusetts, is called Preserve and specializes in American-made personal care and kitchen products that can be recycled.

Making a Razor Last Longer

Some consumers purchase disposable razors because they cannot afford the purchase of a high-quality, reusable razor. Consumers that find themselves in this situation can cut down on waste by taking steps to make the razor last longer. Rust is a common problem with disposables, so it’s important to dry the blade shortly after use. Keeping the blade sharp and free of rust is a matter of storing the blade in olive oil when it is not in use.

Find places to recycle disposable razors at RecyclerFinder.com!
Find places to recycle plastic bottles at RecyclerFinder.com

Around the world people are recycling plastic bottles. Find places to recycle plastic bottles at RecyclerFinder.com

If you look in your cupboards and in your refrigerator, you’ll find any number of plastic bottles. While many of plastic bottles end up in landfills, these plastic bottles can be recycled over and over again into useful products.

Before you recycle your plastic bottles, be sure to separate the caps from the bottles as these are of a different plastic. Wash them out and remove labels if so required by local regulations before sending them to be recycled.

The bottles are collected and hauled to a plant set up for recycling. If you turn over your bottles, you’ll find numbers and/or icons on the bottom. These identification codes designate different polymer types of material. Two identification codes used on the bottom of plastic bottles are the numbers “1” and “2”. Polyethylene terephthalate will show a “1,” while high-density polyethylene will show a “2” on the bottom of the bottle. Once the bottles are inside the recycling plant, they are sorted out in accordance with their type of polymer material.

After the bottles have been organized according to type of their material, they are once more organized according to color. Similar bottles are then crushed and compacted by huge machines that mold them into bales. These bales are sold to business that specialize in processing the bottles into flakes for the next step in the process.

Polyester fibers are created from bottles with a “1” designation. These become fabrics for clothing, carpet and new bottles. Milk cartons, grocery bags and things like handy, usable bins are created from bottles with a “2” designation.

Unlike glass bottles, plastic bottles are popular because they don’t break when dropped. Unfortunately, they also don’t disintegrate in landfills. However, these bottles can be recycled over and over to provide new products from the old.

Find places to recycle plastic bottles at RecyclerFinder.com!
plastic bottle recycling

View of over 2 million plastic bottles for recycling.

When people recycle, they protect the environment and prevent valuable materials from going to waste. However, it’s important to check the recycling codes on bottles, tubs, bags and other items. Proper sorting improves efficiency and reduces the operating costs of recycling facilities. Plastic manufacturers use seven different codes.

#1 PETE/PET: Polyethyl tetraethylenei. Many beverages come in plastic bottles of this type. If your city doesn’t accept these bottles, you may be able to bring them to a redemption center.

#2 HDPE: High-density polyethylene. Manufacturers often use this plastic for rigid containers. Most recycling programs accept this type. You may have to recycle number two plastic bags at a grocery store.

#3 PVC/V: Polyvinyl chloride. Various chemical containers and other products contain this plastic. Only some towns and cities accept it. Remember to thoroughly rinse out any chemical residues.

#4 LDPE/LLDPE: Low-density polyethylene or linear low-density polyethylene. This more flexible plastic is used in some bags and condiment bottles. Most cities recycle it.

#5 PP: Polypropylene. This relatively common plastic is found in some cereal bowls and containers for refrigerated foods. You might be able to recycle it in a major town or city.

#6 PS: Polystyrene. This material can come in the form of plastic or foam in disposable cups, trays and cartons. It is particularly harmful to the environment. In most areas, it must be discarded.

#7  OTHER: Unlike the other numbers, seven doesn’t refer to a specific plastic. The material may consist of multiple plastics or a less common type. Few cities recycle it.

Metal, glass and cardboard often lack code numbers. If you need to sort metals, use a magnet; it won’t stick to aluminum. A symbol with a phone number usually means that you must take the item to a special location to recycle it. Contact your local government for specific sorting guidelines.

Sources

1. Argonne National Laboratory, http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/newton/askasci/1993/environ/ENV003.HTM
2. New York City, http://www.nyc.gov/html/nycwasteless/html/resources/plastics_codes.shtml

Find places to recycle plastic @ RecyclerFinder.com!
Srap into Cash

Everyone can use a little extra cash these days. Turn your scrap into cash at RecyclerFinder.com!

Scrap yards and bulk recyclers are willing to pay for certain materials, but many people don’t realize that their junk could be worth cash. With its new mobile application function, RecyclerFinder.com makes it even easier to research and locate local and regional companies that pay for copper, brass, steel, aluminum, glass and more.

The first step is to find out what materials are available to be sold and recycled. Old appliances, furnaces and air conditioners, for example, often include copper tubing and brass fittings. Both materials are in high demand and can bring a nice cash payout. Steel, tin, iron and glass can also be sold at many scrap yards, though the prices per pound are often low. Electric motors, batteries, radiators, and copper wiring and plumbing fixtures are other items commonly purchased by recyclers.

At RecyclerFinder.com, a ZIP-code search quickly reveals a list of nearby facilities that accept specific materials. The recycling company’s name, address, phone number and website are provided, making it convenient to contact the company for information about current prices and other details, such as the amount of sorting and dismantling required. The list of facilities also includes a “Scan and Go” QR code for each center. Once scanned with an iPhone, Android, BlackBerry or other smartphone, the code brings up a map to the recycler along with the contact details.

Recycling scrap can add up to big cash with very little time and effort. It helps keep potentially hazardous materials out of landfills and provides a good incentive to clean up trash in the yard or around the community. RecyclerFinder.com makes the process of tracking down a recycler quick and convenient, and supplies all of the needed details in one place. The new smartphone-friendly QR code takes the guesswork out of getting there with one simple scan.

Turn scrap into cash at RecyclerFinder.com!

recycle juice containers RecyclerFinder.com

Well ex-squeeze me!!!!

Processed orange juice is convenient and relatively good for you, but it harms the environment in many ways. Here are some of the reasons why processed juices aren’t green…

1. Fuel: Manufacturers often transport orange juice hundreds or thousands of miles. The oranges or concentrate may come from Canada, Brazil or another country.

2. Packaging: Most processed juices come in plastic or cardboard packages. Many people don’t recycle the containers, and they end up in landfills or incinerators. Plastic production requires oil and leads to additional drilling. Cardboard harms the environment through increased logging.

3. Water: It takes 44.2 gallons of water to produce one cup of processed orange juice, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. One reason is that evaporation is required to concentrate juices.

4. Pesticide: Compared to most other foods, farmers use more pesticide and fungicide to grow oranges. Pesticides often cause unintended harm to animals and insects that do not threaten crops.

Sometimes they also find their way into fruit juices. Traces of fungicide were found in products from Brazil during December 2011, according to Bloomberg News. Studies have found that this type of fungicide may cause liver tumors in animals.

These practices damage the environment by promoting extinction, pollution and desertification. This is unsustainable, and it may eventually harm the orange growers as well. Fortunately, there are some relatively green ways to make or obtain fruit juices…

A. Buy oranges and make your own. If possible, compost the peels.
B. Purchase it in a large container that you can easily recycle.
C. To reduce pesticide and fuel use, obtain organic or local products.

Find places to recycle anything @ RecyclerFinder.com!

Recycling Tea Bags at Recycler Finder

Tea anyone?

Relaxing with a cup of tea is just about as good as it gets. A few moments of steeping and the tea is ready to drink but how should a person dispose of the used teabag and now empty packet? There are several options for ensuring tea waste is disposed of properly. While yes, empty packets and teabags are not going to overrun the landfills on their own, there are so many environmentally friendly options available to recycle or even reuse the packets.

Some varieties of tea are packaged in foil-lined packets. These packets are not considered paper in terms of recycling and are not recyclable in most areas. The greenest option for the environmentally conscious tea drinker is to change to a brand of tea sold as loose-leaf or packaged in plain paper packets suitable for recycling.

There are countless ways to keep foil-lined packets from ending up in a landfill. How about reusing those foil-lined packets to store seeds? The foil blocks light and prevents moisture from reaching the seeds, making them perfect for storage. In the spring, use the packets to start the seeds. The foil lining helps retain moisture in the small amount of soil held in the packet. Other options include numerous craft ideas. Kaleidoscope folding with empty packets makes unique embellishments for use on scrapbook pages, cards and other paper crafts. Use a variety of empty tea packets to decoupage a box or canister. It could be the perfect place to store recently purchased loose-leaf tea.

Find places to recycle anything @ RecyclerFinder.com

Congrats Giants, great game!

With the excitement of Super Bowl Sunday still on people’s minds as they gather around the water cooler to discuss the plays and highlights, we want to ask the question just where does all that trash go? Are stadiums doing anything to be environmentally responsible?

Sports stadiums across the U.S. are joining the movement to go green. At the college and professional levels, recycling initiatives and other methods to minimize waste are helping the environment and earning the programs nationwide recognition.The statistics are startling. In an average year, an estimated 65 million football fans generate 19,500 tons of trash. Cans, bottles and food containers pile up in trash receptacles from the parking lot to the stadium to the restrooms.College football stadiums, in particular, have made great strides in protecting the environment. One well-publicized example is participation in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Game Day Challenge for college sports stadiums.

In 2008, The New York Times featured the University of Colorado Buffaloes for introducing a composting and recycling initiative that eliminated 80 percent of their waste. They replaced Styrofoam containers with cardboard, and people looking for trashcans in the stadium found composting and recycling bins instead.

In 2010, the EPA presented UC Davis with an award for similar zero-waste efforts. After the games, students and volunteers often had to sort through the containers. Yet, in both cases, once people got over the learning curve of what needed to be recycled and composted, the process was easy. It was helpful to have both written information in the form of programs and billboards at the games, along with staff members instructing the fans.

The efforts are not limited to food containers. Prepared food at games is a huge source of waste that can be recycled, and much of it is now delivered to local shelters and soup kitchens.

Find places to recycle almost anything @ www.RecyclerFinder.com
Mayor Dumagate Recycler Finder

What's the big deal about this Green Living stuff anyway?

The sustainability movement may be focused on preserving the environment, but it is also responsible for introducing some humorous words and phrases to the environmentally conscious. Here are some funny terms that are now part of the green vocabulary:

Greenwashing– This has nothing to do with safely preparing salad, but it does refer to a deceptive type of marketing that makes a company appear to be more green.

Sustainability Champion – He may not win the boxing match, but this corporate warrior can lead his company into the complex world of sustainability.

Apathetics – This term no longer refers only to the teenage population. It also describes people who are least interested in changing their ways to benefit the environment.

Vampire Power – Dracula is scary enough, but when he forgets to unplug his electronics at night, he becomes absolutely terrifying.

Monstrous Hybrid – A werewolf may appreciate this title, but he would not like the fact that his cotton-blend clothes are not recyclable.

Global Weirding – Although this funny phrase sounds like something a teenager would say, this is the new term that replaces global warming. It not only describes the strange weather patterns that have been occurring lately, but it may also describe how some people feel about the new vocabulary.

Find recycling facilities in your area at www.recyclerfinder.com