Archives for posts with tag: how to recycle
How to throw a Green Party

OK let's party! Learn to party throw a Green Party at RecyclerFinder.com!

Even people wanting to live a green lifestyle deserve to throw a party once in a while. However, having concern for the environment can make the party planning process complicated. How can a person throw a fun bash without making a lot of trash?

Green Invitations

People planning a party should look into companies that only sell invitations that have been made from recycled materials. Research whether recycling materials were also used for the envelopes. There are even websites that allow people to design their own recycled invitations.

An even more environmentally-friendly option is foregoing paper invitations entirely and sticking to evites via email or social media websites.

Can Food Choices at Parties Impact the Environment?

Make a point to only purchase enough food for the amount of people coming to the event. This cuts down on the possibility of wasted food ending up in the trash.

For the most green food selections, stick with minimally-processed, locally sourced foods.

Decorating Sans the Landfill

Instead of purchasing paper decorations, decorate by using natural items like fresh flowers, pine cones and dried berries. Recycling is built in as these items can often be used in a compost pile after the event.

Keep trash out of a landfill after an event by choosing only materials that are recycled and can be sent to a center again for repurposing. Recyclerfinder.com is a great resource that lets users find a recycling center in the local area.

Find places to recycle anything and have a green party at RecyclerFinder.com!
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Find places to recycle anything at RecyclerFinder.com!

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Hang ten for recycling in Hawaii. Find places to recycle anything in Hawaii at RecyclerFinder.com

When compared to the rest of the country, the state of Hawaii does remarkably well in terms of waste management. Recycling rates in Oahu are well above the national average, and the capital city of Honolulu ranks among the top cities in the country in terms of landfill diversion. In fact, over 70 percent of Oahu’s municipal waste is diverted from the Waimanalo Gulch Landfill. Waimanalo Gulch is currently the only municipal solid waste disposal site on the island of Oahu, and there have concerns over its expansion over the last several years. Other major landfills in the state include the West Hawaii Landfill in Waikoloa as well as a site in Kekaha. Overuse of these sites would of course be disastrous for the surrounding environment, but officials hope that increases in recycling and expansions of waste-to-energy projects such as the H-POWER plant will further decrease what is sent to Waimanalo Gulch.

The most recent recycling data that is available is for 2010. While the amount of waste that is recycled each year seems to have remained relatively constant, the general rate at which material is recycled has been steadily increasing since 2008. This rate was close to 30 percent in 2010, a significant change from the 2008 rate of 25 percent. This is definitely a positive trend that shows that Hawaiians truly care about reducing the amount of trash that goes into their landfills.

Another major contributor to the decrease of municipal solid waste that is simply thrown out is the expansion of the H-POWER waste-to-energy plant. The H-POWER plant has been in operation in Campbell Industrial Park since 1990. It currently processes 600,000 tons of waste each year and provides seven percent of Oahu’s electricity. Not only does the plant provide a way of disposing of nearly all of the waste collected from Oahu’s homes in a manner that is actually beneficial to the island’s environment, but it also reduces the amount of waste sent to landfills by 90 percent. This is accomplished via incineration. The over 2,000 tons of waste that is sent to the plant each day is incinerated as it is converted into energy. In the end, only ten percent of the waste is thrown out as ash. The plant also reduces Hawaii’s reliance on imported oil. In fact, one ton of trash can as much energy as 60 gallons of oil.

These and other efforts made by the Department of Environmental Services show that those in the state of Hawaii truly care about the environment. With a little more work, it is possible that the people of Oahu can reduce the amount of municipal solid waste even more.

Sources:

http://www.opala.org/
http://www.keepinghawaiiclean.com/landfills.htm

Find places to recycle in Hawaii at RecyclerFinder.com!
Srap into Cash

Everyone can use a little extra cash these days. Turn your scrap into cash at RecyclerFinder.com!

Scrap yards and bulk recyclers are willing to pay for certain materials, but many people don’t realize that their junk could be worth cash. With its new mobile application function, RecyclerFinder.com makes it even easier to research and locate local and regional companies that pay for copper, brass, steel, aluminum, glass and more.

The first step is to find out what materials are available to be sold and recycled. Old appliances, furnaces and air conditioners, for example, often include copper tubing and brass fittings. Both materials are in high demand and can bring a nice cash payout. Steel, tin, iron and glass can also be sold at many scrap yards, though the prices per pound are often low. Electric motors, batteries, radiators, and copper wiring and plumbing fixtures are other items commonly purchased by recyclers.

At RecyclerFinder.com, a ZIP-code search quickly reveals a list of nearby facilities that accept specific materials. The recycling company’s name, address, phone number and website are provided, making it convenient to contact the company for information about current prices and other details, such as the amount of sorting and dismantling required. The list of facilities also includes a “Scan and Go” QR code for each center. Once scanned with an iPhone, Android, BlackBerry or other smartphone, the code brings up a map to the recycler along with the contact details.

Recycling scrap can add up to big cash with very little time and effort. It helps keep potentially hazardous materials out of landfills and provides a good incentive to clean up trash in the yard or around the community. RecyclerFinder.com makes the process of tracking down a recycler quick and convenient, and supplies all of the needed details in one place. The new smartphone-friendly QR code takes the guesswork out of getting there with one simple scan.

Turn scrap into cash at RecyclerFinder.com!

Recycling water in space

Luke, I am a dork!

When astronauts travel into space, they carry along air and water. Volume and weight restrictions limit the amount of supplies that can be carried, so water must be rationed and recycled. This is especially important on long missions. Extended stays at the International Space Station would not be possible without careful recycling.

Water recycling has always been employed at the space station. It is not a glamorous aspect of being an ISS crew member, but astronauts must even recycle urine to preserve limited drinking water supplies.

Recycling equipment on the ISS is a system of modular components. A separate water processor assembly and urine processor assembly function together as the water recovery system, and the water recovery system is part of the larger oxygen generation system. These systems function together to produce enough air and water to support seven ISS crewmembers for extended stays in space.

If manned space exploration is to progress further, size and efficiency of recycling equipment must be optimized. Preservation of all available resources will be critical to interplanetary travel to Mars or the establishment of a lunar colony. The technology ultimately used must be able to sustain astronauts for a period of three years without external resupply.

Researchers are working steadily on several different approaches to recycling. Some efforts focus on mechanical processing, while others use chemical reactions to reclaim oxygen and water. Some research even focuses on bacterial processes, similar to those used at wastewater treatment facilities on Earth, to produce air and drinking water.

Find places to recycle anything at RecyclerFinder.com!

Food Recycling at RecyclerFinder.com

Is this truck suppose to be a rat or a pig? Guess it depends on what they're serving! If you can tell the difference that is.

Lunch trucks, often referred to as roach coaches, are popping up all over many American cities. They’re popular with new bohemians, hipsters and anyone who wants to grab a quick bite to eat but wants to avoid the typical burgers and fries of fast-food chains. The impression these food trucks give is that they focus on green living, recycling and a devotion to the environment and the local community. However, is a lunch truck really more environmentally friendly than a traditional restaurant? For the most part, the answer is yes.

A lunch truck doesn’t use as much energy as a traditional restaurant. Restaurants have to keep their dining rooms well lit and comfortable, which often means compensating for the heat given off from the kitchen. Although food trucks use energy for cooking and fuel to get around, they don’t have to maintain large kitchens, bathrooms or dining spaces.

When it comes to mileage, you might think that a food truck obviously consumes more energy than a restaurant. However, a restaurant’s customers often drive in for their meals. A lunch truck can park at busy locations like office buildings or mall parking lots, eliminating the need for individuals to waste gas. In addition, food trucks tend to focus on providing locally produced food, which requires less transportation to get from the grower to the consumer.

Because lunch trucks provide meals to on-the-go diners, they usually serve their food on disposable dinnerware. However, many food trucks offer recycling or compost bins, reducing the amount of waste they create. Restaurants that serve food on reusable dinnerware don’t create as much waste, but more energy is wasted in the dish washing process. In sum, lunch trucks do tend to be more green than restaurants. They use less energy, take up less space and best of all, they come to you. Next time you’re hungry, walk over to the food truck and order lunch for the whole office. You’ll save gas and help the environment.

Find Places to Recycle Anything at RecyclerFinder.com!

CD Case Recycling at RecyclerFinder.com

Say goodby to CD's, the 90's and these nut jobs! My eyes hurt!

MP3 players, such as iPods, have revolutionized how the masses buy music and provide a compact way to carry around entire music libraries, while also reducing one’s carbon footprint. These rechargeable gadgets have popularized digital downloads and reduced the demand for CDs, making them a big win for the environment, which is music to our planet’s ears.

Of course, with this eco-friendly move away from CDs, which are notoriously hard on the environment with their material requirements, manufacturing process, packaging and long-distance delivery, there are plenty of folks who now are wondering what to do with all of those old CD cases that are taking up space on their bookshelves. The key, of course, is to recycle, which leads to the question of where exactly this CD case recycling happens.

Some CD cases have a recycling code, which most often consists of a triangle with a 6 inside and PS underneath. This lets us know that CDs are categorized as type 6 plastic – aka polystyrene. This type of plastic is not often accepted for pick-up in curbside recycle bins in most cities, but using a site like RecyclerFinder.com is an simple, convenient way to locate recycling facilities that accept CD cases. This makes it easy to do your part to save the planet and helps you get rid of all of those old cases that are no longer needed.

Find places to recycle CD cases at RecyclerFinder.com!