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Is this truck suppose to be a rat or a pig? Guess it depends on what they're serving! If you can tell the difference that is.

Lunch trucks, often referred to as roach coaches, are popping up all over many American cities. They’re popular with new bohemians, hipsters and anyone who wants to grab a quick bite to eat but wants to avoid the typical burgers and fries of fast-food chains. The impression these food trucks give is that they focus on green living, recycling and a devotion to the environment and the local community. However, is a lunch truck really more environmentally friendly than a traditional restaurant? For the most part, the answer is yes.

A lunch truck doesn’t use as much energy as a traditional restaurant. Restaurants have to keep their dining rooms well lit and comfortable, which often means compensating for the heat given off from the kitchen. Although food trucks use energy for cooking and fuel to get around, they don’t have to maintain large kitchens, bathrooms or dining spaces.

When it comes to mileage, you might think that a food truck obviously consumes more energy than a restaurant. However, a restaurant’s customers often drive in for their meals. A lunch truck can park at busy locations like office buildings or mall parking lots, eliminating the need for individuals to waste gas. In addition, food trucks tend to focus on providing locally produced food, which requires less transportation to get from the grower to the consumer.

Because lunch trucks provide meals to on-the-go diners, they usually serve their food on disposable dinnerware. However, many food trucks offer recycling or compost bins, reducing the amount of waste they create. Restaurants that serve food on reusable dinnerware don’t create as much waste, but more energy is wasted in the dish washing process. In sum, lunch trucks do tend to be more green than restaurants. They use less energy, take up less space and best of all, they come to you. Next time you’re hungry, walk over to the food truck and order lunch for the whole office. You’ll save gas and help the environment.

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recycle juice containers RecyclerFinder.com

Well ex-squeeze me!!!!

Processed orange juice is convenient and relatively good for you, but it harms the environment in many ways. Here are some of the reasons why processed juices aren’t green…

1. Fuel: Manufacturers often transport orange juice hundreds or thousands of miles. The oranges or concentrate may come from Canada, Brazil or another country.

2. Packaging: Most processed juices come in plastic or cardboard packages. Many people don’t recycle the containers, and they end up in landfills or incinerators. Plastic production requires oil and leads to additional drilling. Cardboard harms the environment through increased logging.

3. Water: It takes 44.2 gallons of water to produce one cup of processed orange juice, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. One reason is that evaporation is required to concentrate juices.

4. Pesticide: Compared to most other foods, farmers use more pesticide and fungicide to grow oranges. Pesticides often cause unintended harm to animals and insects that do not threaten crops.

Sometimes they also find their way into fruit juices. Traces of fungicide were found in products from Brazil during December 2011, according to Bloomberg News. Studies have found that this type of fungicide may cause liver tumors in animals.

These practices damage the environment by promoting extinction, pollution and desertification. This is unsustainable, and it may eventually harm the orange growers as well. Fortunately, there are some relatively green ways to make or obtain fruit juices…

A. Buy oranges and make your own. If possible, compost the peels.
B. Purchase it in a large container that you can easily recycle.
C. To reduce pesticide and fuel use, obtain organic or local products.

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Congrats Giants, great game!

With the excitement of Super Bowl Sunday still on people’s minds as they gather around the water cooler to discuss the plays and highlights, we want to ask the question just where does all that trash go? Are stadiums doing anything to be environmentally responsible?

Sports stadiums across the U.S. are joining the movement to go green. At the college and professional levels, recycling initiatives and other methods to minimize waste are helping the environment and earning the programs nationwide recognition.The statistics are startling. In an average year, an estimated 65 million football fans generate 19,500 tons of trash. Cans, bottles and food containers pile up in trash receptacles from the parking lot to the stadium to the restrooms.College football stadiums, in particular, have made great strides in protecting the environment. One well-publicized example is participation in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Game Day Challenge for college sports stadiums.

In 2008, The New York Times featured the University of Colorado Buffaloes for introducing a composting and recycling initiative that eliminated 80 percent of their waste. They replaced Styrofoam containers with cardboard, and people looking for trashcans in the stadium found composting and recycling bins instead.

In 2010, the EPA presented UC Davis with an award for similar zero-waste efforts. After the games, students and volunteers often had to sort through the containers. Yet, in both cases, once people got over the learning curve of what needed to be recycled and composted, the process was easy. It was helpful to have both written information in the form of programs and billboards at the games, along with staff members instructing the fans.

The efforts are not limited to food containers. Prepared food at games is a huge source of waste that can be recycled, and much of it is now delivered to local shelters and soup kitchens.

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