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Find places to recycle disposable razors at RecyclerFinder.com

Find places to recycle disposable razors at RecyclerFinder.com

Every year, Americans damage the environment by purchasing and throwing away over two billion disposable razors and razor blades. That means that billions of these pieces of plastic are going to waste and piling up in landfills across the country year after year. The negative impact on the environment could at least partially be avoided through recycling.

Recycling Disposable Razors

Cutting down on waste may be a matter of choosing to recycle a razor or purchase a razor that is made with recycled materials. Some shaving companies are now running programs that allow consumers to send back their used blades and handles to be recycled into new products. The most environmentally-friendly businesses offer a combination of recycled and recyclable handles, with handles made of 100 percent recycled materials that can also be sent back to the company to again be recycled.

Unfortunately, it is not possible to recycle blades in the United States unless the shaving company is specifically running a program in which they allow consumers to send back their used blades. Currently, there is one company in the United States that is actively advertising their ability to recycle a used razor. The company, located in Massachusetts, is called Preserve and specializes in American-made personal care and kitchen products that can be recycled.

Making a Razor Last Longer

Some consumers purchase disposable razors because they cannot afford the purchase of a high-quality, reusable razor. Consumers that find themselves in this situation can cut down on waste by taking steps to make the razor last longer. Rust is a common problem with disposables, so it’s important to dry the blade shortly after use. Keeping the blade sharp and free of rust is a matter of storing the blade in olive oil when it is not in use.

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Find places to recycle plastic bottles at RecyclerFinder.com

Around the world people are recycling plastic bottles. Find places to recycle plastic bottles at RecyclerFinder.com

If you look in your cupboards and in your refrigerator, you’ll find any number of plastic bottles. While many of plastic bottles end up in landfills, these plastic bottles can be recycled over and over again into useful products.

Before you recycle your plastic bottles, be sure to separate the caps from the bottles as these are of a different plastic. Wash them out and remove labels if so required by local regulations before sending them to be recycled.

The bottles are collected and hauled to a plant set up for recycling. If you turn over your bottles, you’ll find numbers and/or icons on the bottom. These identification codes designate different polymer types of material. Two identification codes used on the bottom of plastic bottles are the numbers “1” and “2”. Polyethylene terephthalate will show a “1,” while high-density polyethylene will show a “2” on the bottom of the bottle. Once the bottles are inside the recycling plant, they are sorted out in accordance with their type of polymer material.

After the bottles have been organized according to type of their material, they are once more organized according to color. Similar bottles are then crushed and compacted by huge machines that mold them into bales. These bales are sold to business that specialize in processing the bottles into flakes for the next step in the process.

Polyester fibers are created from bottles with a “1” designation. These become fabrics for clothing, carpet and new bottles. Milk cartons, grocery bags and things like handy, usable bins are created from bottles with a “2” designation.

Unlike glass bottles, plastic bottles are popular because they don’t break when dropped. Unfortunately, they also don’t disintegrate in landfills. However, these bottles can be recycled over and over to provide new products from the old.

Find places to recycle plastic bottles at RecyclerFinder.com!
plastic bottle recycling

View of over 2 million plastic bottles for recycling.

When people recycle, they protect the environment and prevent valuable materials from going to waste. However, it’s important to check the recycling codes on bottles, tubs, bags and other items. Proper sorting improves efficiency and reduces the operating costs of recycling facilities. Plastic manufacturers use seven different codes.

#1 PETE/PET: Polyethyl tetraethylenei. Many beverages come in plastic bottles of this type. If your city doesn’t accept these bottles, you may be able to bring them to a redemption center.

#2 HDPE: High-density polyethylene. Manufacturers often use this plastic for rigid containers. Most recycling programs accept this type. You may have to recycle number two plastic bags at a grocery store.

#3 PVC/V: Polyvinyl chloride. Various chemical containers and other products contain this plastic. Only some towns and cities accept it. Remember to thoroughly rinse out any chemical residues.

#4 LDPE/LLDPE: Low-density polyethylene or linear low-density polyethylene. This more flexible plastic is used in some bags and condiment bottles. Most cities recycle it.

#5 PP: Polypropylene. This relatively common plastic is found in some cereal bowls and containers for refrigerated foods. You might be able to recycle it in a major town or city.

#6 PS: Polystyrene. This material can come in the form of plastic or foam in disposable cups, trays and cartons. It is particularly harmful to the environment. In most areas, it must be discarded.

#7  OTHER: Unlike the other numbers, seven doesn’t refer to a specific plastic. The material may consist of multiple plastics or a less common type. Few cities recycle it.

Metal, glass and cardboard often lack code numbers. If you need to sort metals, use a magnet; it won’t stick to aluminum. A symbol with a phone number usually means that you must take the item to a special location to recycle it. Contact your local government for specific sorting guidelines.

Sources

1. Argonne National Laboratory, http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/newton/askasci/1993/environ/ENV003.HTM
2. New York City, http://www.nyc.gov/html/nycwasteless/html/resources/plastics_codes.shtml

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Srap into Cash

Everyone can use a little extra cash these days. Turn your scrap into cash at RecyclerFinder.com!

Scrap yards and bulk recyclers are willing to pay for certain materials, but many people don’t realize that their junk could be worth cash. With its new mobile application function, RecyclerFinder.com makes it even easier to research and locate local and regional companies that pay for copper, brass, steel, aluminum, glass and more.

The first step is to find out what materials are available to be sold and recycled. Old appliances, furnaces and air conditioners, for example, often include copper tubing and brass fittings. Both materials are in high demand and can bring a nice cash payout. Steel, tin, iron and glass can also be sold at many scrap yards, though the prices per pound are often low. Electric motors, batteries, radiators, and copper wiring and plumbing fixtures are other items commonly purchased by recyclers.

At RecyclerFinder.com, a ZIP-code search quickly reveals a list of nearby facilities that accept specific materials. The recycling company’s name, address, phone number and website are provided, making it convenient to contact the company for information about current prices and other details, such as the amount of sorting and dismantling required. The list of facilities also includes a “Scan and Go” QR code for each center. Once scanned with an iPhone, Android, BlackBerry or other smartphone, the code brings up a map to the recycler along with the contact details.

Recycling scrap can add up to big cash with very little time and effort. It helps keep potentially hazardous materials out of landfills and provides a good incentive to clean up trash in the yard or around the community. RecyclerFinder.com makes the process of tracking down a recycler quick and convenient, and supplies all of the needed details in one place. The new smartphone-friendly QR code takes the guesswork out of getting there with one simple scan.

Turn scrap into cash at RecyclerFinder.com!

Recycling water in space

Luke, I am a dork!

When astronauts travel into space, they carry along air and water. Volume and weight restrictions limit the amount of supplies that can be carried, so water must be rationed and recycled. This is especially important on long missions. Extended stays at the International Space Station would not be possible without careful recycling.

Water recycling has always been employed at the space station. It is not a glamorous aspect of being an ISS crew member, but astronauts must even recycle urine to preserve limited drinking water supplies.

Recycling equipment on the ISS is a system of modular components. A separate water processor assembly and urine processor assembly function together as the water recovery system, and the water recovery system is part of the larger oxygen generation system. These systems function together to produce enough air and water to support seven ISS crewmembers for extended stays in space.

If manned space exploration is to progress further, size and efficiency of recycling equipment must be optimized. Preservation of all available resources will be critical to interplanetary travel to Mars or the establishment of a lunar colony. The technology ultimately used must be able to sustain astronauts for a period of three years without external resupply.

Researchers are working steadily on several different approaches to recycling. Some efforts focus on mechanical processing, while others use chemical reactions to reclaim oxygen and water. Some research even focuses on bacterial processes, similar to those used at wastewater treatment facilities on Earth, to produce air and drinking water.

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Food Recycling at RecyclerFinder.com

Is this truck suppose to be a rat or a pig? Guess it depends on what they're serving! If you can tell the difference that is.

Lunch trucks, often referred to as roach coaches, are popping up all over many American cities. They’re popular with new bohemians, hipsters and anyone who wants to grab a quick bite to eat but wants to avoid the typical burgers and fries of fast-food chains. The impression these food trucks give is that they focus on green living, recycling and a devotion to the environment and the local community. However, is a lunch truck really more environmentally friendly than a traditional restaurant? For the most part, the answer is yes.

A lunch truck doesn’t use as much energy as a traditional restaurant. Restaurants have to keep their dining rooms well lit and comfortable, which often means compensating for the heat given off from the kitchen. Although food trucks use energy for cooking and fuel to get around, they don’t have to maintain large kitchens, bathrooms or dining spaces.

When it comes to mileage, you might think that a food truck obviously consumes more energy than a restaurant. However, a restaurant’s customers often drive in for their meals. A lunch truck can park at busy locations like office buildings or mall parking lots, eliminating the need for individuals to waste gas. In addition, food trucks tend to focus on providing locally produced food, which requires less transportation to get from the grower to the consumer.

Because lunch trucks provide meals to on-the-go diners, they usually serve their food on disposable dinnerware. However, many food trucks offer recycling or compost bins, reducing the amount of waste they create. Restaurants that serve food on reusable dinnerware don’t create as much waste, but more energy is wasted in the dish washing process. In sum, lunch trucks do tend to be more green than restaurants. They use less energy, take up less space and best of all, they come to you. Next time you’re hungry, walk over to the food truck and order lunch for the whole office. You’ll save gas and help the environment.

Find Places to Recycle Anything at RecyclerFinder.com!

CD Case Recycling at RecyclerFinder.com

Say goodby to CD's, the 90's and these nut jobs! My eyes hurt!

MP3 players, such as iPods, have revolutionized how the masses buy music and provide a compact way to carry around entire music libraries, while also reducing one’s carbon footprint. These rechargeable gadgets have popularized digital downloads and reduced the demand for CDs, making them a big win for the environment, which is music to our planet’s ears.

Of course, with this eco-friendly move away from CDs, which are notoriously hard on the environment with their material requirements, manufacturing process, packaging and long-distance delivery, there are plenty of folks who now are wondering what to do with all of those old CD cases that are taking up space on their bookshelves. The key, of course, is to recycle, which leads to the question of where exactly this CD case recycling happens.

Some CD cases have a recycling code, which most often consists of a triangle with a 6 inside and PS underneath. This lets us know that CDs are categorized as type 6 plastic – aka polystyrene. This type of plastic is not often accepted for pick-up in curbside recycle bins in most cities, but using a site like RecyclerFinder.com is an simple, convenient way to locate recycling facilities that accept CD cases. This makes it easy to do your part to save the planet and helps you get rid of all of those old cases that are no longer needed.

Find places to recycle CD cases at RecyclerFinder.com!