Archives for category: Lingerie
CD Case Recycling at RecyclerFinder.com

Say goodby to CD's, the 90's and these nut jobs! My eyes hurt!

MP3 players, such as iPods, have revolutionized how the masses buy music and provide a compact way to carry around entire music libraries, while also reducing one’s carbon footprint. These rechargeable gadgets have popularized digital downloads and reduced the demand for CDs, making them a big win for the environment, which is music to our planet’s ears.

Of course, with this eco-friendly move away from CDs, which are notoriously hard on the environment with their material requirements, manufacturing process, packaging and long-distance delivery, there are plenty of folks who now are wondering what to do with all of those old CD cases that are taking up space on their bookshelves. The key, of course, is to recycle, which leads to the question of where exactly this CD case recycling happens.

Some CD cases have a recycling code, which most often consists of a triangle with a 6 inside and PS underneath. This lets us know that CDs are categorized as type 6 plastic – aka polystyrene. This type of plastic is not often accepted for pick-up in curbside recycle bins in most cities, but using a site like RecyclerFinder.com is an simple, convenient way to locate recycling facilities that accept CD cases. This makes it easy to do your part to save the planet and helps you get rid of all of those old cases that are no longer needed.

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The Happiest Place on Earth!

Theme parks aren’t known for their recycling efforts or for attempting to reduce their carbon footprint. But with recent developments it seems that amusement parks are starting to do their part to keep the world as green as possible as long as possible.Major theme parks like Six Flags and Disney World have started recycling programs in order to keep the millions upon millions of plastic cups and the like out of landfills. Some amusement parks have even switched to biofuel to fuel rides and machines, friendly cleaning products and locally grown ingredients in their eateries.

An online company called Green Halo Systems allows users to track what they recycle and where it’s going. What this means for amusement parks is that Green Halo software will give them the ability to see what they waste and how much they waste. Now companies can see first hand the impact they have on the environment rather than having to make an educated guess. Any data from Green Halo software can be shared with multiple users and can also be printed out.

Other efforts some theme parks are making to go green are using LED lights, switching to water-saving fixtures and switching from plastic trash bags to ones that are biodegradable.

For many of us, an amusement park is one of the last places that we could think of as going green, but why not? It’s place where a large amount of people gather, eat and walk, which can add up to quite a lot of trash in a short amount of time. Amusement parks are doing their part to keep the environment intact, make sure you’re doing yours.

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RecyclerFinder.com Cedar Creek Correctional Facility Washington Recycling Program

Cedar Creek Correctional Facility in Washington Recycling Program

Gone are the days when college campuses and aging hippies had a virtual monopoly on dedication to the environment. Another, perhaps unexpected, segment of society has recently begun to embrace vital strategies for protecting the earth. Prison facilities throughout the United States are increasingly showing their commitment to environmentally conscious operations by instituting a variety of recycling programs and other green initiatives largely staffed by inmates. Glass and plastic recycling, composting, organic farming and land conservation projects are just some of the ways in which prisons across the country are embracing a more earth-friendly philosophy while simultaneously providing enhanced rehabilitation opportunities and skills acquisition assistance for incarcerated individuals.

A prime example of the trend toward these environmentally responsible facilities is that of Cedar Creek Corrections Center in Washington state. Inmates there raise thousands of pounds of organic vegetables each year, turn discarded shoes into artificial turf that can be used on children’s playscapes, and compost the majority of the prison’s food waste. The green initiatives being launched at prisons nationwide also extend to clean energy projects focused on harnessing wind and solar power. The Ironwood State Prison in California recently utilized over 6,000 solar panels placed at the facility to generate energy sufficient to power over 4,000 homes for a period of 12 months. Wind turbines have sprouted up at an Indiana prison, where wood chip powered water boilers are also in use. Prisoners in North Carolina correctional facilities have regularly been tasked with converting large food shipping containers into cisterns capable of collecting rainwater.

RecyclerFinder.com Cedar Creek Correctional Facility Washington Recycling Program

Changing their lives and the environment for the better. Great job.

The benefits of these types of green initiatives and recycling programs can be quite substantial, given the enormous amount of resources and energy typically consumed by correctional facilities. However, the positive impact may go well beyond the achievement of lower operating costs and reductions in environmental damage. The life skills gained by inmates who participate in such initiatives and the public-spirited nature of the work in which they are engaged may ultimately help trim the number of re-offenders and encourage a greater sense of personal responsibility among prisoners upon release.

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recycle juice containers RecyclerFinder.com

Well ex-squeeze me!!!!

Processed orange juice is convenient and relatively good for you, but it harms the environment in many ways. Here are some of the reasons why processed juices aren’t green…

1. Fuel: Manufacturers often transport orange juice hundreds or thousands of miles. The oranges or concentrate may come from Canada, Brazil or another country.

2. Packaging: Most processed juices come in plastic or cardboard packages. Many people don’t recycle the containers, and they end up in landfills or incinerators. Plastic production requires oil and leads to additional drilling. Cardboard harms the environment through increased logging.

3. Water: It takes 44.2 gallons of water to produce one cup of processed orange juice, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. One reason is that evaporation is required to concentrate juices.

4. Pesticide: Compared to most other foods, farmers use more pesticide and fungicide to grow oranges. Pesticides often cause unintended harm to animals and insects that do not threaten crops.

Sometimes they also find their way into fruit juices. Traces of fungicide were found in products from Brazil during December 2011, according to Bloomberg News. Studies have found that this type of fungicide may cause liver tumors in animals.

These practices damage the environment by promoting extinction, pollution and desertification. This is unsustainable, and it may eventually harm the orange growers as well. Fortunately, there are some relatively green ways to make or obtain fruit juices…

A. Buy oranges and make your own. If possible, compost the peels.
B. Purchase it in a large container that you can easily recycle.
C. To reduce pesticide and fuel use, obtain organic or local products.

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Recycling Tea Bags at Recycler Finder

Tea anyone?

Relaxing with a cup of tea is just about as good as it gets. A few moments of steeping and the tea is ready to drink but how should a person dispose of the used teabag and now empty packet? There are several options for ensuring tea waste is disposed of properly. While yes, empty packets and teabags are not going to overrun the landfills on their own, there are so many environmentally friendly options available to recycle or even reuse the packets.

Some varieties of tea are packaged in foil-lined packets. These packets are not considered paper in terms of recycling and are not recyclable in most areas. The greenest option for the environmentally conscious tea drinker is to change to a brand of tea sold as loose-leaf or packaged in plain paper packets suitable for recycling.

There are countless ways to keep foil-lined packets from ending up in a landfill. How about reusing those foil-lined packets to store seeds? The foil blocks light and prevents moisture from reaching the seeds, making them perfect for storage. In the spring, use the packets to start the seeds. The foil lining helps retain moisture in the small amount of soil held in the packet. Other options include numerous craft ideas. Kaleidoscope folding with empty packets makes unique embellishments for use on scrapbook pages, cards and other paper crafts. Use a variety of empty tea packets to decoupage a box or canister. It could be the perfect place to store recently purchased loose-leaf tea.

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Recycling in schools at RecyclerFinder.com

Our educational system seems to be working just fine!

A generation ago, when classroom wastebaskets were filled with worksheets and empty lunch packaging, there was little emphasis on recycling or preserving the environment. Today’s schools have made big strides towards becoming green. Most have a standard recycling program throughout the building, and many teachers include environmentalism in their instructional units. Today’s students are taught to recycle, reuse and to conserve.

A typical school recycling program includes colored bins in classrooms and common areas where students can place plastic, glass and paper. Many schools have annual recycling drives that encourage students to bring in aluminum cans or other recyclables to help raise funds for the school. During lesson time, teachers also encourage reusing containers and paper for projects or note taking. These steps have made recycling a normal part of the student routine.

Elementary students also learn about caring for their environment in other ways. Taking a cue from First Lady Michelle Obama’s kitchen garden, many schools also introduce children to the importance of protecting our environment through hands-on experience in a class garden. Students may participate in preparing the soil, selecting and planting seeds, watering, weeding and harvesting the produce.

Environmental field trips also help to reinforce young students’ awareness, with nature center and forest preserve visits becoming more and more popular. The quintessential zoo field trip has become focused on the plight of endangered species and practical ways students can contribute to their conservation.

Through school wide mandates, classroom lessons and field trips, today’s school children receive a comprehensive education in how to reuse, restore and conserve the earth’s resources.

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This funny commercial is making people laugh while helping the environment. Check it out yourself YouTube – Funny Raccoon Commercial

RecyclerFinder.com - Funny Raccoon Commercial

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Be my Valentine! XXXOOO

Red roses and chocolates are popular Valentine’s Day gifts, but they are usually not good for the planet. Imported roses are associated with the use of pesticides, and the most popular brands of chocolate are not organic or grown in a healthy environment. Still, one of the best ways to celebrate love is to keep it personal and totally unique. With this in mind, there are plenty of ways to keep Valentine’s Day green.

Everyone loves to receive homemade cookies or brownies. These can be made with organic ingredients, and there won’t be any packaging to throw out.

Many couples like to dine out, and it isn’t hard to find restaurants that are green. Some of the most romantic restaurants are the ones that are independently owned and not part of a large chain. In most cases, these restaurants use organic food that is grown locally.

A quiet meal at home is a nice alternative to eating out. This doesn’t have to be a fancy dinner; it can be a simple meal of fruit, cheese and a nice bottle of organic wine.

It’s possible to give flowers as a gift without harming the planet, and there are several alternatives to roses that are in season now. A live plant also makes a great Valentine’s Day gift. A potted plant is not only good for the environment, but it is also the perfect way to express undying love.

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I can't miss with my new Taylor Made Nuclear Driver XXXXL!

Few people actually pay attention to the damage to the environment that occurs when golf courses are built. This is not due to apathy or stupidity – it is simply the result of ignorance of and lack of information that surrounds the topic. With increasing awareness and concern for the environment, many people are coming to terms with the idea that many of our modern conveniences, such as courses for golfers, are actually causing more harm and costing us more in “green fees” while much better alternatives are available.

This is in fact a very pertinent topic as golf-related tourism is increasing around the world. This sport is spreading to many countries where the ecology is sensitive to change, and this heralds a new era for environmentalists as they try to combat the spread. These courses are particularly damaging in the sense that while they may look green, natural, and appealing to the eye through landscaping efforts, they actually wipe out all pre-existing plants and animals in favor of a landscape devoid of true nature. This leads to a false dichotomy – it looks like the outdoors, but golf courses are as far from nature as a sprawling asphalt parking lot.
To build a course, investors choose a site that is appealing to golfers – many of whom are in the upper and middle classes. Traditionally, these sites are around or within sprawling suburbs, but recently, a new form of golfing courses has emerged that caters to a sense of exoticism. Courses located on mountaintops, in jungles, and by coasts are becoming increasingly common as they attract huge numbers. These present many environmental problems as these areas are especially sensitive to destruction.
Once a site is selected, regardless of where it is – the landscape is decimated in an attempt to open up the space so needed for golfing. Trees are scythed down and the soil is churned up, destroying the homes of birds, mammals, and insects alike. All courses call for tightly manicured lawns – this signals the most pervasive form of environmental damage in the business. In order to grow the unnaturally vibrant grasses for golf, pesticides and fertilizers are used extensively. The grass is of an unnatural variety, unable to grow without close tending. It demands incredibly high levels of water, which is sucked up from the surrounding water table and causes a high loss of water to the nature surrounding the courses. In turn, the pesticides and fertilizers dumped on the grass dissolve into the ground water, causing extensive pollution of the ground water, and surround lakes and streams.
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I think a deer just fell in the hole!

This sport is far from being ecologically friendly. It kills plants and animals alike with ambivalence, and the end result is a destroyed environment. Greater alternatives to outdoor activities would be simply purchasing land to preserve in its natural form, for use as a hiking, birdwatching, and nature refuge – not destroying it for something that only cheaply imitates the outdoors. That all sounds great and everything but I’m not willing to give up my golf game.

After all is said and done, new course architects and designers are slowly starting to address and accommodate environmental issues with respect and designing courses with drought resistant plants, grasses that require less pesticides and water, and even integrating the environment into the course design reducing the need for terra-forming. Now if they can only make the fairways wider and the holes bigger!
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Congrats Giants, great game!

With the excitement of Super Bowl Sunday still on people’s minds as they gather around the water cooler to discuss the plays and highlights, we want to ask the question just where does all that trash go? Are stadiums doing anything to be environmentally responsible?

Sports stadiums across the U.S. are joining the movement to go green. At the college and professional levels, recycling initiatives and other methods to minimize waste are helping the environment and earning the programs nationwide recognition.The statistics are startling. In an average year, an estimated 65 million football fans generate 19,500 tons of trash. Cans, bottles and food containers pile up in trash receptacles from the parking lot to the stadium to the restrooms.College football stadiums, in particular, have made great strides in protecting the environment. One well-publicized example is participation in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Game Day Challenge for college sports stadiums.

In 2008, The New York Times featured the University of Colorado Buffaloes for introducing a composting and recycling initiative that eliminated 80 percent of their waste. They replaced Styrofoam containers with cardboard, and people looking for trashcans in the stadium found composting and recycling bins instead.

In 2010, the EPA presented UC Davis with an award for similar zero-waste efforts. After the games, students and volunteers often had to sort through the containers. Yet, in both cases, once people got over the learning curve of what needed to be recycled and composted, the process was easy. It was helpful to have both written information in the form of programs and billboards at the games, along with staff members instructing the fans.

The efforts are not limited to food containers. Prepared food at games is a huge source of waste that can be recycled, and much of it is now delivered to local shelters and soup kitchens.

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